An Astronaut’s Guide to Life on Earth
by Col. Chris Hadfield

An Astronaut’s Guide to Life on Earth: What Going to Space Taught Me About Ingenuity, Determination, and Being Prepared for Anything

Chris Hadfield is a man of many talents and accomplishments, and now besides husband, father, test pilot, astronaut and guitar player (an incomplete list at best), he can now add writer. He presents his many life lessons (from “sweating the small stuff” to “aiming to be a zero”) in a sincere and humble style. So humble, in fact, that it was a relief of sorts when I got to the section where he defends his assignment as commander of Expedition 35 to the ISS after some emergency surgery made NASA question his fitness to fly. He is never angry or bitter, but he does show his frustration with bureaucracy.

His life lessons are well told and integrated with descriptions of the nuts and bolts of being an astronaut in the space program. You find out about things like what flight rules are and how they can keep you alive, and what a family escort does. Especially enjoyable is the detailed description of his five month mission to the ISS from pre-flight to re-entry to the extended physical recovery required after an extended stay in zero gravity.

2 thoughts on “An Astronaut’s Guide to Life on Earth
by Col. Chris Hadfield

  1. Almost like a band’s road manager for the astronaut’s family. They are another member of the astronaut corps that the one going into space picks for the position. They are trusted do everything from getting temperature adjusted in a relative’s hotel room, to helping a family navigate NASA bureaucracy. They are even there should something happen on Earth to the astronaut’s family, or if something bad happens to the astronaut on their mission. Hadfield has been one himself, and he describes it as a very humbling and grounding experience.

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