Möbius Rollers, Blender 3D and Fusion 360

A bunch of Möbius Rollers

I think I was first introduced to the concept of a Möbius strip in high school. This simple yet weird thing that can be made from a single strip of paper, one end given a 180º twist, and then the ends taped together. If you trace the surface of the resulting object, it has only one continuous face, and there’s only one edge. There are also weird results when you cut it different ways.

A Möbius strip is actually an ideal mathematical construct, like a point, plane, or cube. One you make out of paper is a physical representation of that ideal construct, but paper actually has thickness. But, that’s interesting, because what you’ve actually done is made a long, thin rectangular solid into a Möbius cube, which has one surface, and one edge. I made the Möbius Roller to answer a question in my head: What would it look like to inflate the side (edge) of a Möbius strip? (Then I had to add the channel that follows the side with balls that roll in the channel – because it was cool 😀.)

What has that to do with Blender and Fusion? Well, I originally learned Blender in order to make this object. I don’t know if you can make it in Fusion. (I genuinely don’t know, I’d like to see how, if it’s possible.) Anyhow, it wasn’t too hard to find a tutorial for Blender that showed how to make something like this shape, and I adapted it.

Does that make Blender better than Fusion? No. There are advantages to each. For example, making an object from a dimensioned drawing (like an engineering or architectural drawing) is much easier in Fusion than in Blender.

You can buy a Möbius Roller on my Etsy shop: https://www.etsy.com/listing/648795534/mobius-roller

Pentaflake Tabletop

Sanded and Varnished

I’m still working on the video, but I wanted to get something up on HipNerd.com about finishing this project, since I already posted to social media about it.

I had more trouble with the Maslow, but finally got a good cut.

Pentaflake pattern being cut into plywood by Maslow CNC.

Pentaflake pattern being cut into plywood by Maslow CNC.

The bit was dull from the tests I ran previously, so I changed bits halfway through, then re-ran the program to clean up the hairy stuff from the dull bit. Finally, something worked in my favor, and it cleaned up well.

Before and after changing bits.

Before and after changing bits.

I sanded the insides of the cutouts by cutting up a sanding sponge, folding it over and zip-tying it to a dowel, then putting the dowel in my drill.

I cut the tabletop into a circle using a router on a jig.

Cutting the circle using a router on a jig.

Cutting the circle using a router on a jig.

I painted a coat of clear epoxy resin into the cutouts to seal, then poured the the colored epoxy using condiment dispensers.

Tabletop with Seal Coat and Colored Epoxy

Tabletop with Seal Coat and Colored Epoxy

I sanded off the excess epoxy with 80 grit sandpaper, working in sections.

Sanding in progress

Sanding in progress

I sanded everything smooth, working my way to a final 400 grit hand sanding. I put some edge banding on to hide the plywood edge. Then, I put on three coats of varnish.

Sanded and Varnished

Sanded and Varnished

I’m really happy with the way this came out, and looking forward to some more projects with my Maslow.

Maslow CNC First Project: Pentaflake Tabletop, Test #5 (I Think?)

For test #5 (there’s been so many tests, I think this was #5) of the Pentaflake Tabletop, I modified the clip on the router with a big bushing with plenty of surface area for epoxying, and used some epoxy putty made for gluing metal to metal (JB Weld SteelStik). End result: a really solid bushing, which keeps the clip perpendicular to the z-axis screw.

Router Modification: Added a bushing to the clip on the router's z-axis control to eliminate slop.

Added a bushing to the clip on the router’s z-axis control to eliminate slop.

I modified the g-code (see Hand Editing G-Code for Better Machining), and I added a bungee over the top of the router to keep constant sideways pressure on it.

The test was a success.

Pentaflake Tabletop Test #5

Pentaflake Tabletop Test #5

The cuts are clean, no burning. And, the depth is exactly the same across the whole piece.